Unit 2 - Talk about your students and your career

In this unit you will learn:

  • Read
  • Vocabulary
  • Video
  • Practice
  • Skills
  • Practice 2
  • Culture
  • Self-assessment

What do judges and other teachers want to know?

About you
Your subject: What subject do you teach?
How long you have been in your school: How long have you been there?
 
About your class
Age: How old are your pupils?
Number of students: How many pupils do you teach?
Home: Where do they come from?
Level of English: What is their level of English?
 
About your school
Name: What is the name of your school?
Location: Where is your school?
Type of school: What kind of school is it?

People may ask you all these questions. They may ask you some of them.
You need to prepare an answer to each question.

NOTE: students, pupils or kids?
Educators use different words to describe children. Pupils are children in primary and secondary school. Students are 16 years old and more. They study at college or university. Kids is an informal word. It means children. However, many educators prefer to use the word students to describe pupils and students.


Listen to Afrazia and match the answers to the questions.

How many questions in one sentence?
Sometimes people ask you a lot of questions in one sentence. How many questions can you find in this sentence?

'Can you please tell me where you are from, what you do and the title of your project.'

There are three:
where you are from
your job
the title of your project


How many questions can you find in these sentences?

If you don't understand a question, you say:

'Sorry, can you ask the question again more slowly, please?'

In this unit you will learn: How to be polite. How to say you don't understand. How to answer questions about your school and your students. How to answer questions about yourself. How to answer questions simply.

A Match the word to the definition

Watch this video. Match the statements to the person.

Complete the sentences.

NOTE: We can say:
My students are twelve years old.
My students are twelve years of age

NOTE: teach, taught, taught
I teach English. Present tense. It is my job.
I taught French. Past tense. I taught French but now I don't.
I have taught English for four years.
I started four years ago and I am teaching English now.

Listen to Afrouz. Which is the correct sentence?

Script: Yes, my name is Mrs Afrouz Zakatia Reddy. I'm from Tahrwar District, which is a northern district in Karnataka state, which was in the southern part of India. So, I have put nearly 30 years of service, 16 years as an elementary teacher, primary school teacher and remaining other services as high school teacher. Now I am playing my role as a teacher educator in the English language.

Fill the gap by typing the best word or phrase.

You need to say:
Your name
What country you are from
The school you teach at
How long you have taught there
What kind of school it is
The level of your students
The number of students in your class
The title of your project and why it is important

Look at these statements. Mark each one True or False.

SCRIPT
Gareth: A lot of my students are not really interested in writing when it comes to their assignment work, so I had to think how best to switch my students on.

Jean Roch: And I teach since ten years and before I was teaching with � I was teaching to read by reading and now I use a tool to teach reading by writing. This tool, it's Twitter, the social network. So it's good for young children but I think it's the good tool because Twitter is short so every pupil can succeed to write a short message, a tweet.

Egyptian teacher
My project is about under eighteen. I am under eighteen but I can serve my country. It was a reflection or inspiration after the Egyptian revolution and at the first election my students were so depressed. Why we can't vote like you? We want to share the responsibility, we want to take our role in the community to help Egypt, to build it again and make nice ... good effect on our country. So I said, yes you can�you can do many things, not only voting, just the whole thing � a few years and you can vote but now you can do.

Note: Interested in
My students are interested in computer games.
My students are not interested in writing.

Note: was teaching/taught
I taught reading by reading. (I did it.)
I was teaching reading by reading but now I teach reading by writing. (I was doing it but I stopped.)

Listen carefully to what Chitra says and drag the statements into the correct column.

(Some recordings were made by non-native speakers of English. We have not corrected the script.)

Script.
Hi. I am Chitra from Tamil Nadu, India. And I am a primary school teacher who teach kids from six to eleven group of age. And I came here to show my project, Grammar Rocks. All right. Having as a second language. English is a second language for us so children have a fear in them to speak out. So they are not correct with the content. So I started them to teach grammar to songs.

Listen to the example conversation

Jacky: Tell me your name.
You: My name's Sarah. Sarah Watson.

Jacky: Tell me where you are from.
You: I'm from London, in the UK.

Jacky: Tell me the name of your school. Where do you teach?
You: Warwick School. It's near London.

Jacky: What kind of school is it?
You: It's a state secondary school.

Jacky: How long have you taught there?
You: I've taught there for about 15 years.

Jacky: What subject do you teach?
You: I teach Spanish.

Jacky: How old are the students you teach?
You: They're 12 to 14 years old.

Jacky: And what level are they in the school?
You: Elementary level. But they're not very interested in Spanish.

Jacky: Mm! And how many students are in your class?
You: I have 25 students.

Jacky: Good. And finally, what is the title of your project?
You: Espanol para todos. Spanish for everybody.

Jacky: Great! Thank you very much.

 

Listen to Jacky and answer her questions.

Jacky: Tell me your name.
You:

Jacky: Tell me where you are from.
You:

Jacky: Tell me the name of your school. Where do you teach?
You:

Jacky: What kind of school is it?
You:

Jacky: How long have you taught there?
You:

Jacky: What subject do you teach?
You:

Jacky: How old are the students you teach?
You:

Jacky: And what level are they in the school?
You:

Jacky: Interesting! And how many students are in your class?
You:

Jacky: Good. And finally, what is the title of your project?
You:

Jacky: Great! Thank you very much.

 

Now practise, talk about you, your school, your students and your project title. Then listen to the model.

Listen - A presentation Radislaw Mirowski is a teacher. Here is his introduction.

Script: Hello, I'm Radoslaw Mirowski. I teach science in school. It's a small school in Bydgoszc. It's about three hours from Warsaw, the capital. It's a state secondary school and we've got about 800 pupils. I teach 14- and 15- year olds and I prepare students for the school leaving examination. My classes have got about 25 to 30 students but some of them are not very interested in science. Our state schools are co-educational so I have boys and girls in my class. In fact, more girls than boys. We have a learning platform for science and the students really enjoy using it. We would really like to have a partner school and I'd be really happy to keep in touch. Please ask me any questions about my class and school. I'll be happy to answer them. And thank you.

These words are very important in English:
Please?
Thank you.
Sorry.
Pardon.
Excuse me.

 

G2: How to say you don't understand

Apologise and ask Sorry? Pardon?
Say you don't understand Sorry, I don't understand.
Sorry. I didn't catch that. (I didn't hear what you said.)
Ask for repetition Sorry, could you say that again, please?
Sorry, could you repeat that, please?
Ask the person to speak more slowly Sorry, could you speak a bit more slowly, please?
And when they explain or repeat, always say Thank you.
Thanks.
They may ask Is that clearer?
Is that OK now?
Always say That's much better. Thank you.
   



Notes: can/could
Can you say it again, please?
Could you say it again, please?
�Could' is more polite and more formal than �can' in this kind of sentence.



Listen to the conversation. Speak at the same time as Tony.

Tony: Excuse me.
Jacky: Yes?
Tony: Can I ask you a question, please?
Jacky: Certainly.
Tony: Thank you. Can you tell me your name, please?
Jacky: I'm Jacky.
Tony: Sorry. I can't you! Can you say it again, please?
Jacky: Sorry?
Tony: Sorry. I'll ask the question again. Can you tell me your name, please?
Jacky: Jacky.
Tony: Oh, sorry. I'm Tony.

Take a minute to reflect on what you have just learned.
  • What did you understand in this section?
  • What do you think you can revise and what do you want to practise again?